Kiss vs. Smooch: What's the difference?

  • By reComparison Contributor
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Difference between Kiss and Smooch

If you've ever walked off your front porch step after touching lips with that guy in your life and wondered if he was really in love with you, or if you are a fleeting romance, your answer probably lies in the intensity of the lip locking.  The difference between true love and true “fun for now” can be defined by whether your inter-lock was a smooch or a kiss.  Although at certain times you can smooch and kiss with the same guy, when that moment comes and you are looking into one another’s eyes and the world falls away, the lip connection most certainly defines the relationship.

Kiss
Smooch

A Kiss… is Not Just a Kiss

A relationship has been lost or enhanced by one lip lock.  Dating is confusing and frustrating and feels confined by so many imposed “rules” although no one has a handbook.  There is one certainty, however, the first kiss.

A Quick Display of Affection

A smooch is something that your grandmother asks for when she leaves your house. A smooch is something that you ask your five year old niece for when you see her, or your three year old daughter when you are walking out the door. A smooch has nothing romantically linked behind it. When giving a smooch there are no butterflies, no roller-coaster feeling in your stomach. It is a lip lock that says “lets touch, make human contact and move our separate way”. A smooch never involves an open mouth or tongue touching, it is a way to be connected to someone in a non-sexual way. A kiss is when you touch your lips to someone and you feel electricity. The minute you kiss, or touch your lips to someone, there is an electrical current that runs through your body and literally pulls the breath from your lungs. A kiss leaves you a bit dizzy and definitely wanting to be closer. It is something that says to the receiver that you are interested in more human contact, and is usually a precursor to something more physical. It can sometimes involve an open mouth, or not, but either way, a kiss is something that is sexual in nature. While a smooch is the end to a feeling, a kiss is the beginning to something larger, something more primordial. A smooch is a quick touch lips and get out, a kiss can linger forever, and involves different moves with the lips rotating them together in such a way to become intertwined, hoping to remain connected for as long as possible.

Is It Love?

Nothing defines the way a relationship is going to progress than that very first kiss. If the kiss was more of a “thank you” for the evening, then it was a smooch, and your relationship will probably not set the world on fire, or you. If, however, that first kiss was the kind that made the hair stand up on the back of your neck, made you a little light-headed, and made you want to ask him in for another drink, then that was a kiss and the potential of love, well, who knows. A kiss, however, definitely means love is in the air.

Summary

  • A smooch is a non-romantic display of affection
  • A kiss is an interlude to sexual foreplay
  • A smooch is something that you give quickly and are done
  • A kiss lingers as long as possible
  • A kiss is the ‘window to the soul’ of the kisser(s)

Which one lingers the longest?
  • Kiss
  • Smooch
 
 

Discuss It: comments 6

i think u change the places of words , in place of kiss u have to wrote smooch and vice versa

  • Guest
  • John Oliver wrote on June 2010

M g, you are completely wrong. The article correct, read up...

  • Guest
  • Reets wrote on February 2011

no i think mg is right,, the article is not fully correct......

  • Guest
  • Pravin wrote on April 2011

i think mg is right.......

  • Guest
  • nevilread wrote on May 2011

Certainly as the words are used in my area. A kiss can mean anything. Smooching is something a normal person would never do with their grandma. Grandma might joking ask for a smooch when she means a quick kiss.

Also smooching involves more than a kiss. It includes the embrace.

Just MHO from the usage as I've seen/heard.

  • Guest
  • Shacks wrote on December 2011

dis article has surely exchnged d words!

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