NFL vs. AFL

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Difference between NFL and AFL

Sports has been an integral part of human heritage ever since the dawn of civilization. Young or old, men of all ages love to watch and play sports, and as do some women. Men love to watch sports on TV or better yet watch it live because it incites their primal urge to compete against their rivals. Men will often pick a team or side and more often a team from their hometown. Some sports are more competitive than others, often more competitive sports require an athlete to work harder and play harder, thus the more competitive the sport, the more it's appeal. One of the most competitive sports played in the United States is football, which can be classified in two leagues; the American Football League, AFL and the National Football League, NFL. 

The Playing Field

The playing field in the AFL and the NFL differ and have the following specs. In the AFL the field width is 85 feet, while the length is 50 yards and has 8 yards of end zone that calculates to a total of 198 feet of total field size. The side lines in the AFL are 48 inches high with a foam barriers. In the NFL, the field's width is 160 feet while the length is 100 yards with a total of 10 yard end zones, which calculates to a total of 360 feet total field size. The sidelines are configured as 6 foot painted borders.

NFL
AFL

Scoring System

The AFL and NFL differ in their scoring system. In the AFL, a touchdown counts as 6 points, while points after touchdown are the following: successful place kick equals 1 point, successful touchdown equals 2  points, successful drop kick equals 2 points.  In the NFL the a touchdown counts as 6 points, while points after touchdown are the following: successful place kick equals 1 point, successful touchdown equals 2  points, which is basically the same as the AFL. NFL drop kicks equal 3 points.

Team Structure



In the AFL 20 team members remain active while 4 men are on standby. During offense 8 players are on the field, and 4 men are on the line. During defense 8 players are on the field and 3 lineman. In the NFL the team size can be unlimited. During offense 11 players are usually on the field and 7 men are on the line. During defense 11 players are on the field, while 5 men are down linemen.

Goal Post Structure

In the AFL the goal post is usually 9 feet wide and has a 15 feet high cross bar. The goal rebound nets are 30 feet wide on both goal posts and 32 feet high. In the NFL the goal posts are usually 18.5 feet wide and have a 10 feet high cross bar, however, what really differs from the AFL is that the NFL does not have goal side rebound nets.

Timing System

The AFL and NFL differ from their timing system. In the AFL each quarter consist of 15 minutes which has a total of four quarters. while half time(s) are around 15 minutes, and have time of in between plays of 25 seconds. The overtime in AFL is 15 minutes that guarantees at least 1 possession for each team. In the NFL each quarter consist of 15 minutes, while half time(s) are around 12 minutes, and have time of in between plays of 40 seconds. The overtime in the NFL is 15 minutes sudden death.

Summary

  • Football is one of the most competitive sports out there, and is by far has one of the biggest followings in the United States. Football is enjoyed by mostly men and some exceptional women. American football fans most popularly follow the AFL and the NFL. Out of the two the NFL is the more popular one.
  • The Playing field in the AFL and the NFL differ quite a bit, out of the two the NFL has the larger playing field.
  • The scoring system in AFL and NFL differ as well, each has their own standard of scoring system, particularly suited for their athletes. 
  • The team structure in the AFL and NFL are different and out of the two the NFL can have the most players on a team. 
  • The size of the goal post is larger in the AFL, since AFL players are not as experienced players as NFL players.
  • The timing structure on both leagues tends to be equally strict, with a few exception on both teams. 

Which league has better quarterbacks?
  • NFL
  • AFL
 
 

Discuss It: comments 1

  • Guest
  • BigSean wrote on September 2013

You have no idea about AFL do you. Have you even watched a full game?

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