Billiards vs. Pool: Make Your Best Shot

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Difference between Billiards and Pool

With summer already here, lots of children and adults alike play games in their ample spare time. With the football season over, there are other games that interest people such as in-door games and other games that don’t involve you running in the hot summer sun. In-door games such as billiards and pool have been around since the 15th century. Although both games look very similar in the terms that they both use a billiards table, a cue-stick and round shaped balls, the two games have some key differences which set them apart. Skill at one type of billiards game is widely appropriate to the other, but expertise more often than not requires at least a degree of specialization.

Billiards
Pool

Balls

Billiards balls are superior in size to pool balls and come mostly as a set of two cue balls, one plain white and one colored or marked and a red objective ball. Globally standardized from time to time called "American-style" or "Kelly" pool balls, used in several pool game and found all through the Earth. They come in sets of sixteen, including 2 suits of numbered objective balls, seven stripes (9-15) seven solids (1-7) and a black 8 ball and a white cue ball. "British style" balls are to some extent smaller and appear in unnumbered suits of reds and yellows.

Tables

There are several styles and sizes of carom and pool tables. With the exemption of a number of variants of bumper pool and a number of unique tables, most billiard tables are rectangles that are almost twice as long as they are broad. A majority of pool tables are known as 7, 8 or 9 footers, suggesting the length of the playing surface's extended side. The beds and rail cushions of every kind of billiard type tables are covered with a firmly woven, napless fabric called baize, usually of beaten wool, even though wool nylon blends are ordinary and some synthetics are in use.

Racks & Cues

Billiards does not make use of ball racks. Depending upon the definite game in question, the balls may be released at random or placed in extremely precise positions at the commencement of the game. In the majority of pool games, the objective balls are firmly racked at a precise spot on the table.Both games are of course played with a stick known as a cue. A cue is typically either a one-piece pointed stick, commonly called a "house cue”. The butt end of the cue is of larger perimeter and is intended to be gripped by the player's shooting.

Similarities and Differences

  • Billiards and pool may look like the same game to the beginner but in fact both games are completely different. There are several differences among them.
  • Billiard balls are larger in size when compared to pool balls; there are two types of balls in billiards, a white cue ball and red objective balls. In pool the balls come in sets of sixteen.
  • Most billiard tables are rectangles that are almost twice as long as they are broad. Most of pool tables are known as 7, 8 or 9-footers, suggestive of the length of the playing surface's extended side.
  • In billiards there is no use of ball racks. Depending upon the definite game in question, the balls may be released at random, or placed in extremely precise positions at the commencement of the game. In most pool games, the objective balls are firmly racked at a precise spot on the table.

Which game is cooler?
  • Billiards
  • Pool
 
 

Discuss It: comments 2

  • Guest
  • Pool Tables wrote on October 2010

A very well written article. Pool & billiards is the same thing, it all depends on where you life to what you call it.

  • Guest
  • pool table playing area wrote on October 2012

A many thanks to you guys for sharing these information. It definitely provides valuable and informative insights to everyone. I really appreciate your write-up.

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